Golf Tournament Foods – What to Eat or Drink after a Golf Tournament

Golf tournament foods are essential to golfers when planning for a golf tournament like the upstream golf tournament. Sometimes golfers think that the rules of sports nutrition don’t apply to them or that they can tough out a tournament with minimal dietary preparation.

But the reality is just the opposite. Because golfers play multiple rounds during a day or play multiple days back-to-back. Therefore, it is essentially impossible to perform well in every game if you aren’t taking in food and fuel.

While this may seem like the time when your body is the least picky about food, performing at your peak requires a game day nutritional game plan.

Here are some tips and recommendations for snacks during tournament play:

Your tournament snacks should, ideally, be as food-like as possible.

On the spectrum of energy drinks, protein powders, gels, Shot Bloks, and protein bars to sandwiches, bananas, and nuts, try to have the majority of your fuel be real food. Real food means food that is minimally processed and doesn’t contain tons of added preservatives, sweeteners, chemicals, and additives.

Sports nutrition products are often a mishmash of weird ingredients. The ingredients for Shot Bloks, for example, are tapioca syrup, dried cane syrup, maltodextrin, pectin, citric acid, caffeine, electrolytes, and a handful of stabilizers and preservatives. These aren’t real foods — and while they might give you a burst of energy, their “nutrition” is unsustainable for a full day of any sport.

Real foods, or golf tournament foods that are made up mostly of real foods like fruit, nut, and seed-based bars provide calories, carbohydrates, protein, fats, and electrolytes, giving your body real energy to run hard.

If you’re concerned about electrolytes, or if you’re playing in hot and humid weather, I recommend electrolyte enhanced drink tablets like Nuun, which offer sodium, potassium, magnesium, and calcium but with no added sugars.

There is, however, a time and a place for sports drinks, gels, and Shot Bloks — and that’s for athletes who can’t handle much, or any, solid food during a tournament. See below…

Golf tournament foods should fuel you through eight or more hours of ultimate.

As I’ve mentioned before, playing golf all day burns a good amount of calories–and it’s important to fuel your body while you’re playing. This starts with a healthy breakfast.  

After that, what, how much, and how often you eat depends on how well you can digest food and then exercise immediately after. These factors can vary quite a bit between golfers, so it’s important to figure out what works for you.

Practice is a perfect time to figure out the types and timing of snacks that will maximize your performance. In general, snacks should combine carbohydrates, protein, and fat–but the exact ratios will be different for everyone.

There are a slew of studies that claim that one carb to protein to fat ratio—or fueling with fluids as opposed to solids–is better than another, but it’s important to remember that real life isn’t a clinical study. We’re not playing in a laboratory where all confounding variables are controlled; just because fifteen male endurance cyclists cycled faster and for longer when they sipped on a sports drink compared to when they ate a banana doesn’t mean that you will too.

Your golf tournament foods or snacks should not hinder your ability to play.

The previous two points mean nothing if your golf tournament foods or snacks leads to discomfort. If you’re the type of person who can’t handle a lot of solid food during tournaments, you may have to rely on the more processed foods that I mentioned above.

Fast-burning or high glycemic index carbs (carbohydrates that are absorbed into your bloodstream at a faster rate; these include foods like white bread, pretzels and dried fruits) may also be a better choice than slow-burning or low glycemic index carbs (carbohydrates that are absorbed at a slower rate; these include many whole grains, beans, legumes, most fruits, and vegetables).

Golf Snacks – Fruits and Nuts

Dried fruit and nuts are another healthy option because they’re energy dense but don’t take up a lot of room in your stomach.

Likewise, the previous two points also mean nothing if you’re not taking in enough fuel to play your best. Throughout the years, I’ve seen many golfers who don’t pack enough food, who barely eat any food at all, or who subsist solely off of highly processed foods like energy drinks, candy bars, and potato chips.

Eating too few calories is a problem I see players make often, and I think it’s one big reason why many golfers crash at the end of the day. Even eating incredibly healthy, nutrient-dense foods that I would otherwise recommend as a heathy snack — raspberries and kale, for example — will not provide enough calories to fuel you through a tournament.

Quantity and quality need to be taken into consideration: focus on getting enough calories from high quality foods, and aim to get carbohydrates, healthy fats, and protein in every snack to provide sustained energy.

Other Golf Tournament Foods Tips

Eat often

Many sports nutritionists say that once you’re thirsty, you’re becoming inadequately hydrated–and you’re already playing below your optimal level. Hunger is similar, but the effects are even more pronounced–once you’re hungry, your abilities are reduced significantly.

Your decision-making may also take a hit; hunger strikes, and you’re no longer the best golfer you can be. For most people, I recommend eating small amounts of food often (every couple of holes, for example) as opposed to large amounts only a few times a day.

This will provide your body with sustained energy, and your GI tract won’t be as stressed since you’re eating such small amounts of food.

Bring options

I could probably live off the golf tournament foods in my tournament bag for three days — not because I actually eat that much, but because I want options.

I don’t eat all of my food–or even come close to it–because the point is to have options when I come off the course. Sometimes I want a bite of a bar and sometimes I want a handful of snap peas. Packing options will allow you to eat the food that your body wants at that specific time, maximizing performance and minimizing GI discomfort.

Ideal Snacks

Banana and Justin’s Nut Butter

A banana contains easy-to-digest carbohydrates, while Justin’s Nut Butter squeeze packs provide more calorie-dense energy with protein and fats .These are perfect sideline snacks because both are portable; and the squeeze packs allow you to squeeze out as much or as little almond or peanut butter as you want.

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Advantages of an FPSO – 6 Key Advantages of an FPSO

There are several advantages of an FPSO in the oil and gas industry. Here, we list six key advantages which include;

Advantages of an FPSO

Time – FPSOs can connect to any pipeline. In addition, when an existing oilfield is depleted, an FPSO can move to another location. This saves time and money and mitigates the need to build expensive permanent pipelines and facilities. As such, FPSOs make an ideal solution for smaller oil and gas fields that will be depleted in a matter of years.

Cost – With FPSO, O&G companies are not required to build permanent structures like pipelines and piled buildings. FPSOs have the capability to store processed oil and gas and offload it to shuttle tankers for transportation to refineries.

According to Investopedia, a purpose-built FPSO can cost north of $800 million, especially if their production capabilities exceed 250,000 barrels per day (BPD). Meanwhile, a traditional offshore oil platform can cost up to $650 million. While the initial cost of an FPSO is slightly higher, FPSOs prove to be more cost-effective in the long run.

The cost of a traditional offshore oil platform can skyrocket when other expenditures are taken into account, such as maintenance, well completion costs and platform decommissioning costs. 

Safety – FPSOs can be disconnected from the pipelines and oil wells they are moored to. This makes FPSOs a safer option in areas with severe weather conditions.

Convenience – Oil producers can lease the vessels, giving oil and gas companies greater flexibility over their assets ensuring they can react to market forces. An oil and gas producer can conceivably lease as many or as little FPSOs as they want. This kind of flexibility isn’t feasible with fixed assets which take years to build and finance. This not only saves costs but it bridges the gap between small and large oil and gas organisations, ensuring healthier competition.

More viable fields – Some oil and gas fields lack commercial viability due to weather hazards, the distance to the shore or the cost-inefficiency of building and maintaining traditional infrastructure. FPSOs mitigate this by being insensitive to deep-water and adverse weather.

Storage capabilities – FPSOs can store a substantial amount of oil and gas, increasing the commercial viability of hard to reach fields.

Limitations of FPSO

While there are numerous advantages to FPSO, it does have a few limitations.

Conversion time – Converting a tanker into an FPSO can take up to two years. While this is something to consider, it is still substantially faster than building a pipeline.

Self-competition – Companies may find that they are competing with their own pipeline-based infrastructure.

Initial Cost – The upfront cost of an FPSO can be more than the cost of building a large fixed offshore platform.

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Components of an FPSO – 8 Key Components of an FPSO Vessel

There are several Components of an FPSO that are important to proper functioning of the facility.

Here is a rundown of the core components of an FPSO vessel.

Components of an FPSO Vessel

Spread mooring: Spread mooring is a traditional mooring system, incorporating a number of mooring lines attached to the hull of the vessel. These mooring lines are anchored onto the seabed.

FPSO turret (weathervaning) – The turret is integrated into the FPSOs hull, so the hull weathervanes around the mooring system and the mooring line. This enables FPSOs to position the vessel favourably against the wind so that it remains bow to wind and weather.

A turret mooring system is critical for harsh weather conditions. In essence, the turret enables the FPSO to freely rotate while moored to various locations on the seafloor. 

Detachable FPSO turret – Many turret systems allow the turret to be disconnected from the vessel, but remain attached to the mooring lines on the seabed. This is particularly useful in situations such as hurricanes and storms, where the vessel needs to react quickly to external hazards.  Once the threat has been mitigated, the FPSO can return to the turret, reattach and continue operations. This mooring system is by far the most flexible.

Gas dehydration – Gas is often saturated with water vapour, which poses a threat to facilities. Gas dehydration removes the water that is associated with natural gas.

Gas compression – Natural gas must be treated to conform to commercial standards.

Water injection – Water injection is a process where water is introduced into a reservoir to encourage oil production.

Gas, water and oil separator – As water, gas and oil have different densities, they can be separated with gas rising to the top, water on the bottom and oil staying in the middle. Additional debris such as sand will settle at the bottom.

Seawater treatment – Sea water treatment involves removing sulfates and other unwanted elements from injection water.

Benefits of FPSO

Why have FPSOs become so important for oil & gas companies?

Conceptually, FPSOs have given oil and gas companies a lot of freedom and versatility with regards to exploration and extraction. FPSOs enables companies to produce oil & gas and explore increasingly remote areas at a cheaper price in comparison to traditional offshore oil and gas production and storage methods. 


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FPSO – A Guide to a Floating Production Storage and Offloading

What is FPSO? Floating Production Storage and Offloading is a core element of the oil & gas extraction and refinement process.

What is FPSO?

At its core, an FPSO facilitates the processing and storage of oil and gas at sea.  
It stands for floating production storage and offloading (FPSO). These vessels are used extensively by the offshore industry and have become one of the primary methods of oil and gas processing and storage. As its name suggests, an FPSO is a floating vessel that acts as a mobile offshore production and storage facility. They are typically employed and leased by oil and gas companies.  

The vessels themselves are equipped with processing equipment for the separation, storage and offloading of oil and gas that comes from sub-sea oil wells or platforms. When oil and gas is processed, it is safely stored in the FPSO until it can be offloaded onto a tanker or a pipeline for transportation ashore.  

Origins of Floating Processing Facilities

The first FPSO was a converted oil tanker, built by Shell in 1977. Before the time of FPSOs, oil and gas extraction was more difficult and inefficient.

Companies were only able to extract oil and gas from shallow fields, no more than a water depth of 50 metres. Oil and gas had to be transported to land via a subsea pipeline, which is economically unviable at water depths more than several hundred metres and in instances where the seabed oil and gas fields are hundreds of miles away from the shore.  

Oil and gas awaiting transport was stored in tankers called floating storage and offload units (FSO). FSOs were used to store extracted hydrocarbons (a mixture of oil, gas and water) and transport it from remote locations such as distant seabeds. However, FSOs can’t process oil and gas, which is where the FPSO comes in.

FPSO definition 

As onshore oil discoveries continue to decline, FPSOs will become increasingly more vital for the oil and gas industry. There are more than 200 FPSOs today operating around the globe. They’re less expensive than traditional offshore oil and gas platforms, more flexible, safer, and time-efficient. Here is a breakdown of the FPSO acronym:

Production – The “P” in FPSO is what separates these vessels from FSOs. Production refers to the processing of oil and gas. Hydrocarbons are produced in seabed wells and this is transported to the FPSO via flowlines and risers. The hydrocarbons are then separated into oil, gas, water and impurities via the production facilities on the deck of the FPSO.  

Flowlines – Flowlines carry hydrocarbons directly from seabed well. These can be flexible or rigid.

Risers – Developed for vertical transportation. This is the section of the line from the seabed to the topside.

Storage – Once the oil has been processed, it is transferred to cargo tanks in the double hull of the vessel.

Offloading – Offloading refers to transferring the gathered contents to additional transfer conduits. Crude oil that is stored in the vessel is then transferred to tankers and pipelines heading ashore. Gas is either transported to the shore via pipeline or recycled back into the field to increase production.

Design of Storage Facilities

In terms of design, most FPSOs take the form of a supertanker and it can be difficult to distinguish between the two. The defining visual difference of an FPSO is the processing equipment that is stored aboard the vessel’s deck. Meanwhile, hydrocarbon storage facilities are typically situated  below the hull.

Traditional tankers can be converted to an FPSO, giving them an additional element of flexibility. In terms of mooring, the FPSO vessels can be anchored to multiple points on the sea floor, which is called spread morning, or via a central weather vane.

In addition to oil and gas processing equipment, FPSOs can be expected to have living quarters to provide accommodation for staff during long periods out at sea, along with control rooms, offices and recreational facilities.

Core Components of an FPSO vessel.

Spread mooring: Spread mooring is a traditional mooring system, incorporating a number of mooring lines attached to the hull of the vessel. These mooring lines are anchored onto the seabed.

FPSO turret (weathervaning) – The turret is integrated into the FPSOs hull, so the hull weathervanes around the mooring system and the mooring line. This enables FPSOs to position the vessel favourably against the wind so that it remains bow to wind and weather.

A turret mooring system is critical for harsh weather conditions. In essence, the turret enables the FPSO to freely rotate while moored to various locations on the seafloor. 

Detachable FPSO turret – Many turret systems allow the turret to be disconnected from the vessel, but remain attached to the mooring lines on the seabed. This is particularly useful in situations such as hurricanes and storms, where the vessel needs to react quickly to external hazards.  Once the threat has been mitigated, the FPSO can return to the turret, reattach and continue operations. This mooring system is by far the most flexible.

Gas dehydration – Gas is often saturated with water vapour, which poses a threat to facilities. Gas dehydration removes the water that is associated with natural gas.

Gas compression – Natural gas must be treated to conform to commercial standards.

Water injection – Water injection is a process where water is introduced into a reservoir to encourage oil production.

Gas, water and oil separator – As water, gas and oil have different densities, they can be separated with gas rising to the top, water on the bottom and oil staying in the middle. Additional debris such as sand will settle at the bottom.

Seawater treatment – Sea water treatment involves removing sulfates and other unwanted elements from injection water.

Benefits of FPSO

Why have FPSOs become so important for oil & gas companies?

Conceptually, FPSOs have given oil and gas companies a lot of freedom and versatility with regards to exploration and extraction. FPSOs enables companies to produce oil & gas and explore increasingly remote areas at a cheaper price in comparison to traditional offshore oil and gas production and storage methods. 


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Floating Liquefied Natural Gas – A guide to understanding FLNG

In oil and gas industry, floating liquefied natural gas (FLNG) is not just a term that rolls elegantly off the tongue but one also used to describe an offshore facility floating above a natural gas field.

FLNGs produce, liquefy, store and transfer liquefied natural gas via carrier ship to the mainland where both the market and the money is based.

FLNG technology can unlock gas resources from underwater gas fields that may once have been economically or environmentally challenging to obtain. This can help to meet growing demand for natural gas — the cleanest-burning hydrocarbon — which is set rise by more than half by 2040, according to the International Energy Agency. Many natural gas resources are located in offshore fields, but geographic, technical and economic limitations make a number of these difficult to develop.

FLNG technology is designed to overcome these challenges. It is complementary to conventional onshore liquefied natural gas (LNG) as it helps accelerate the development of gas resources to meet growing demand.

What is liquefied natural gas?                                          

Liquefied natural gas (LNG) is natural gas, a mixture of methane and ethane, that has been cooled down to liquid form so it can be easily transported. In its liquid state, LNG takes up around 1/600th the volume of natural gas in its gaseous state. It is odorless, colorless, non-toxic and non-corrosive. Hazards, however, include flammability after vaporization into a gaseous state, freezing and asphyxia.

The liquefaction process removes dust, acid gases, helium, water and hydrocarbons that could cause difficulty downstream. Aboard an FLNG facility, natural gas produced from underwater fields is processed and chilled to -162° Celsius (-260° Fahrenheit). This shrinks its volume by 600 times to create LNG. The advanced design of facility’s on-board LNG plant packs a typical land-based LNG plant into around one quarter of its normal size.

Natural gas is mainly converted into LNG to achieve natural gas transport over the seas where laying pipelines is possible. LNG achieves a higher reduction in volume than compressed natural gas (CNG) which makes LNG cost efficient in marine transport over long distances. LNG is principally used for transporting natural gas to markets, where it is regasified and distributed as pipeline natural gas.

How does FLNG work?

The FLNG facility is moored directly above the natural gas field. It routes gas from the field to the facility via risers. The gas is then processed and treated to remove impurities and liquefied through freezing, before being stored in the hull. Ocean-going carriers will offload the LNG, as well as the other liquid by-products, for delivery to markets worldwide. The conventional alternative to this would be to pump gas through pipelines to a shore-based facility for liquefaction, before transferring the gas for delivery.

Safety on Floating Liquefied Natural Gas

Designers optimize safety on the facility by locating storage facilities and process equipment as far from crew accommodation as possible. The accommodation areas of visiting LNG carriers are also at maximum distance from critical safety equipment. Safety gaps have been allowed between modules of process equipment so that gas can disperse quickly in the event of a gas leak.

What are the benefits of FLNG?

Natural gas is relatively clean burning compared to other fossil fuels. It is also more easily found, cheaper and actually provides a number of environmental and economic advantages.

Firstly, there is no need for pipelines, compression units, dredging, jetty construction or an onshore LNG processing plant as processing is done at the gas field. This helps maintain marine and coastal environments. The facility is also able to be decommissioned and re-deployed elsewhere relatively easily.

Floating liquefied natural gas is more economically viable than pumping gas to the shore, opening new business opportunities for both developing countries and regions where disputes would make pipelines impractical. As well as this, the role of LNG as direct use fuel without regasification is growing slowly but surely.

What are the drawbacks of FLNG?

When it comes to the design and construction of the FLNG facility, every element of a conventional LNG facility needs to fit into a space around one quarter the size, whilst maintaining safety and flexibility of production. Containment systems and product transfers also need to withstand the effects of the wind and waves.

What is the history of Floating Liquefied Natural Gas?

Experimental development of offshore LNG production began in the mid-1990s. Mobil developed a FLNG production concept based on a square structure with a moon pool in the center, known as ’The Doughnut‘, in 1997. Following that, major projects conducted by the EU and major oil and gas companies made great progress in steel concrete hull design, topside development and LNG transfer systems. The first completed FLNG production facility was the PFLNG Satu, off the shore of Sarawak in Malaysia.

Since the mid-1990s, Shell has been working on its own FLNG technology. This includes engineering and the optimization of project developments in Namibia, Timor Leste/Australia, and Nigeria. In July 2009, Royal Dutch Shell signed an agreement with Technip and Samsung allowing for the design, construction and installation of multiple Shell FLNG facilities.

Shell’s Prelude facility is set to be the biggest one ever.

Prelude: What is the future of FLNG?

Launched in 2013, Prelude is Shell’s first FLNG facility. She recently reached a significant milestone when gas was introduced onboard for the first time. The Gallina, an LNG Carrier from Singapore, shipped the gas to the facility and utilities can now switch to run on gas rather than diesel.

Prelude is now on location, 475km (295 miles) north-north east of Broome, Western Australia, in around 250 metres of water. Once operating, Prelude FLNG will produce and liquefy natural gas from the Browse Basin. Once fully operational, the project will deliver LNG to Shell’s customers around the world while creating significant economic and social benefits for Australia. They include hundreds of jobs, tax revenues, businesses opportunities for local companies, and community programmes.

Prelude’s hull is 488 metres long (1,600 feet). Despite its large proportions, the floating liquefied natural gas facility will take up just a quarter of the footprint of an equivalent land-based LNG plant. She is designed to remain at sea for around 25 years in severe weather conditions and even withstand a category five cyclone. FLNG facilities can then be re-deployed to develop new gas fields.

FLNG technology offers countries a more environmentally-sensitive way to develop natural gas resources. Prelude will have a much smaller environmental footprint than land-based LNG plants, which require major infrastructure works. It also eliminates the need to build long pipelines to the mainland.

Conclusion

In conclusion, and over the lifespan of Prelude, the project is expected to add billions of revenue to Australia’s economy, create hundreds of direct and indirect jobs, spend billions on Australian goods and services and improve the country’s balance of trade through export of LNG, LPG and condensate.

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Prelude FLNG Facility – Shell’s Largest Facility to Produce Gas

Prelude FLNG Facility is the world’s largest floating liquefied natural gas platform as well as the largest offshore facility ever constructed

What is the history of FLNG?

Experimental development of offshore LNG production began in the mid-1990s. Mobil developed a FLNG production concept based on a square structure with a moon pool in the center, known as ’The Doughnut‘, in 1997. Following that, major projects conducted by the EU and major oil and gas companies made great progress in steel concrete hull design, topside development and LNG transfer systems. The first completed FLNG production facility was the PFLNG Satu, off the shore of Sarawak in Malaysia.

Since the mid-1990s, Shell has been working on its own FLNG technology. This includes engineering and the optimization of project developments in Namibia, Timor Leste/Australia, and Nigeria. In July 2009, Royal Dutch Shell signed an agreement with Technip and Samsung allowing for the design, construction and installation of multiple Shell FLNG facilities.

Shell’s Prelude facility is set to be the biggest one ever.

Prelude – What is the future of FLNG?

Launched in 2013, Prelude is Shell’s first FLNG facility. She recently reached a significant milestone when gas was introduced onboard for the first time. The Gallina, an LNG Carrier from Singapore, shipped the gas to the facility and utilities can now switch to run on gas rather than diesel.

Prelude is now on location, 475km (295 miles) north-north east of Broome, Western Australia, in around 250 metres of water. Once operating, Prelude FLNG facility will produce and liquefy natural gas from the Browse Basin. Once fully operational, the project will deliver LNG to Shell’s customers around the world while creating significant economic and social benefits for Australia. They include hundreds of jobs, tax revenues, businesses opportunities for local companies, and community programmes.

Prelude’s hull is 488 metres long (1,600 feet). Despite its large proportions, the FLNG facility will take up just a quarter of the footprint of an equivalent land-based LNG plant. She is designed to remain at sea for around 25 years in severe weather conditions and even withstand a category five cyclone. FLNG facilities can then be re-deployed to develop new gas fields.

FLNG technology offers countries a more environmentally-sensitive way to develop natural gas resources. Prelude will have a much smaller environmental footprint than land-based LNG plants, which require major infrastructure works. It also eliminates the need to build long pipelines to the mainland.

Conclusion

In conclusion, it is worth noting that over the lifespan of Prelude FLNG facility, the project is expected to add billions of revenue to Australia’s economy, create hundreds of direct and indirect jobs, spend billions on Australian goods and services and improve the country’s balance of trade through export of LNG, LPG and condensate.

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